Don’t be like me

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There’s a natural tendency to believe that authors share those helpful, how-to blog posts because they know what they are talking about and have sufficient experience to know the methods they share are effective. Well not this time folks! You should not do what I do when it comes to caring for your tools. You should do better!

Around this time, every year, I decide to do some major cleaning and sharpening of all my bonsai tools. Why now? Because I’m bored. There’s nothing to cut with my scissors, so I will sharpen them instead!

The problem is, I don’t really do much tool care except for this one time per year — and I should be ashamed of myself! That’s where you need to do better. I know I should clean my tools more often, but I just don’t.

One of the tool care items I should use more often, because it really is a great, easy to use item, is this thing:

You wanna know what it’s called? Read the package… and then tell me what it says. I can tell you that you should be able to find this or a similar product by searching “rust eraser” online. And that’s what it is. It’s a small rubbery abrasive block that is great for removing rust, sap and other buildup from your tools.

Take a look at the dark, sappy buildup on the inside of this concave cutter blade, above, for example. After just a little careful rubbing, making sure not to rub my fingers against any sharp blades, the deposits are gone, below.

Using this abrasive cleaning tool is step one in my big cleaning and sharpening event today. I pulled out a pile of tools and examined each for areas that needed cleaned and used the rust eraser on everything first.

Then I checked each to see if sharpening was needed. Today I used my son’s three sided wet stone assembly to take care of any sharpening that was needed. (Thanks, Cole.)

The trickiest part about sharpening is laying the blade at the correct angle on the stone. It takes some practice, and if you are not used to sharpening your own tools, there are a bunch of helpful videos available on line.

Another check I make on each tool is that the hinges haven’t come loose. I didn’t need to correct anything this year, but many bonsai tools can be tightened up with a good hammer whack against an anvil or other solid surface.

With everything cleaned up and sharpened, the last thing I do is give everything a spray and wipe down with good ol’ WD-40.

There’s nothing better for keeping water away from your steel, so I make sure everything has a good protective layer on it. I don’t even mind if the tools are a little bit oily right now. I can wipe them off more later. They are just going to sit around for the rest of the winter, waiting for spring to come so they can get busy again.

Kinda like me.

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Improving Bonsai Winter Storage

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I believe I promised an update to my winter storage facilities. Pictured first is a structure I fondly refer to as my bonsai cabinet. I have used this, as you see here, for a few years but decided I need to expand a bit.

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Removing Beech Leaves for Winter Storage

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I have collected a few American beech, Fagus grandifolia, in recent years and have enjoyed learning about their growth habits and watching them regain strength. I know the American beech is less ideal for bonsai than its smaller-leafed European cousin, but I am interested to see how bonsai techniques will impact these native trees.

American beech bonsai, collected 2018

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Why do you bonsai?

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We don’t ask this question frequently enough: “Why do you practice bonsai?” And when we ask it, I don’t know that many people answer in a way that really helps us understand how different each of our approaches can be. Responding with something like, “I really love trees,” or, “I love the time I spend in my garden,” for example, is not really the kind of answer that is helpful. When I ask why, here, I really mean WHY?! What is your purpose? What are your goals? What sets you apart from others? Knowing your WHY should drive your decisions, your actions, and your interactions with other bonsai enthusiasts.

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The Way Bonsai People See the World

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I happened to pass a shopping center where they were tearing out all of the trees and shrubs from all the medians in the parking lot. My reaction to this really got me thinking about just how differently bonsai people see the world.

I guess this distinction was brought into focus when I ask someone working in one of the shops how long the work had been going on. When I suggested I might take one or more of the plants she looked at me like I was an alien.

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August Ficus Work

A friend of mine shared that August 11 (an oddly specific date) is the “perfect time to repot ficus.” I’m not sure exactly where he got that info, but coupled with the familiar “hottest day of the year” advice, I will conclude that it is not too late to repot two small ficus I have been meaning to get to.

Both trees are very early in their development. The first is this Ficus microcarpa which I have dubbed “Captain Jack.”

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Bonsai Watering: Another Perspective

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As an educator, I have always held a deep appreciation for a new or different perspective to understand an idea. I admit, when faced with a student who didn’t understand what was going on, I have repeated the exact same words I said a moment before (no doubt with more sarcasm than belongs in a classroom). I hope this was only at times when the student just wasn’t paying attention, because if the student didn’t understand something because of the way I explained it, they deserve an opportunity to hear it in a different way.

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